Tagged: americana

Bendigo Fletcher – Bendigo Fletcher

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Sweet Southern Rock

Self Released – May 12, 2017

I first heard of Louisville’s Bendigo Fletcher in early March. Around that time, they put out “Sleeping Pad” as a single (which you can read a little more about here), following that up in May with a four-song EP. The release opens with “Sleeping Pad,” which sets a nice tone for the remaining tracks in the lyric “open your eyes and find a damn good reason to live.” “Joni Blue” is a little dreamier with a lot of texture in blending violin and understated synthesizers – it manages somehow to turn a clever phrase about wanting someone to come back using global warming as its metaphor. The opening of “My Dad” is washed out and filtered from somewhere far away before it locks instantly into focus. The track is the catchiest and most concise of the four here as Anderson sings about his dad flying back from overseas to land back in his mother’s arms. Last on the EP is “Dislodger,” a sweet track about wanting to understand another person. Bendigo Fletcher come across in their music as a band made up of kind, happy folks – listening to their music just makes you feel good.

Tracks I Liked: Sleeping Pad!!, Joni Blue!, My Dad!! Dislodger!

Ben Southworth – June 11, 2017 – Post Road

Joan Shelley – Joan Shelley

a2716870051_10Acoustic Americana

No Quarter – May 5, 2017

Louisville’s Joan Shelley is known for her quiet, soothing music and beautiful, clear voice – Joan Shelley is elegantly all of these things, and a quietening listening experience throughout. The album begins with the quiet track, “We’d Be Home,” featuring a pair of guitars churning softly beneath Joan’s voice as she repeats “if you were made for me, we’d be home.” On “Where I’ll Find You,” the space is filled with shuffling, brushed percussion and a light organ – the song’s highlight is Joan’s vocal duet in the chorus. My favorite of the album is “Even Though,” a brief, simply-orchestrated song of plodding, finger-picked guitar and voice that manages a beautiful, melancholic fullness in its sound. Piano is added to the texture on “Pull Me Up One More Time,” with electric guitars crying softly in the background – Joan addresses her sister, “have I lingered too long, sister?” before reaching out for a hand, “pull me up one more time, for I have fallen.” The album ends with a droning, dissonant acoustic guitar on “Isn’t that Enough,” where piano doubles Joan’s voice several octaves below during the verses; her final lyrics of the album ask, “isn’t that enough, that you were meant to be free?”

The talent of the album’s remarkable collaborating musicians James Elkington, Nathan Salsburg, and Jeff and Spencer Tweedy is in their subtlety and restraint, adding only what is essential to the texture of these songs. Joan Shelley is an utterly appropriate title for its namesake’s fourth LP – despite the album’s superstar collaborators, Joan’s signature voice and songwriting are the driving, dominant force behind this music. I’d recommend this album with headphones, so you can catch every beautiful, nuanced note beneath the surface.

Tracks I Liked: We’d Be Home!!, Where I’ll Find You!, Even Though!!!, Pull Me Up One More Time!!, Wild Indifference!, Isn’t That Enough!

Ben Southworth – May 1, 2017 – Kenwick Place

Bryan Minks and the Kentucky Sons – Last Will and Testament

a0602957227_10Existential Alternative Country

Self-Released September 2, 2016

Bryan Minks has been a prominent member of the Lexington country // Americana music scene for several years now – you may know him for leading the long-standing band, Those Crosstown Rivals. But where TCR are a diesel-powered, punk-influenced group, the Kentucky Sons channel a more standard modern country sound. Their music is laid out by some member in common with TCR, as well as some new folks – fleshed out with acoustic guitar, fuzzy electric guitar, bass, drums, fiddle, as well as the occasional slide guitar and female vocals.

Many of the songs on Last Will and Testament deal with some fairly heavy stuff: loneliness, regret, and longing for the past. You can hear this well on “Borrowed Time” which is laid out with lots of slide guitar and fiddle, with a repeated chorus of ‘time is all I got left, and there ain’t none to borrow.’ “Cover Me in Hay” is a new take on a TCR song I first heard in 2012, and it’s interesting to hear it in this different light – stripped of the ‘cow-punk’ style it had on Kentucky Gentlemen, it’s quite a bit more somber and serious, but expands on the original song with some more depth and emotion. The standout on the album is “Proud,” a track that nearly hides how dark and lonely the lyrics are with the upbeat sounds in the instrumentation. The song (which has a video you can see here) deals with depression and the desire to make your loved ones proud – ‘I was cold long before my body was ever found, I was a ghost long before you put me in the ground’ are some of my favorite lyrics on the album.

The musicians on Last Will and Testament play with some great chops, and Sneak Attack’s Jason Groves does an excellent job capturing and balancing them all. I’ll admit: I was surprised by the emotion and darkness on this record, but impressed by how Bryan Minks approached the subjects so honestly and straightforwardly. Last Will and Testament is a great sounding record which grapples with some of the big, heavy stuff in the human experience.

Tracks I Liked: Reckless and Free!, Borrowed Time!!, Beautiful Soul!, The Answer!, Proud!!!

Ben Southworth – October 8, 2016 – Kenwick Place

Warren Byrom – Heavy Makes You Happy

warrenbyromHomesick Americana

Self-Released – August 12, 2016

It’s great to have some new stuff from Warren. His first full length, The Fabled Canelandslives in a special, sentimental part of my mind with records like Jeffrey Lewis’ A Turn in the Dream Songs and Yellow Ostrich’s The Mistress – all albums that populated the playbox at WRFL during my first semester of late-night/early-morning shows. I’ve revisited that album – especially songs like “Sidewalk Kings of New Orleans” and “Home” – several times since the spring of 2012, and I’ve taken something new from it upon each repeated listen.

With references to the French Quarter and “the storm” as well as to Old Frankfort Pike and Henry Clay, Heavy Makes You Happy listens like a love song to Warren’s homes – past and present – in New Orleans and Lexington. Alongside these more direct references to place, live more personal life experiences. “Elkhorn Flood Blues” is a night in late summer, paying homage to the might of our own, modest Elkhorn Creek when it occasionally swells past its banks. “Ice” is a live take from UK’s Chandler Hospital that recalls the sounds of trees shedding limbs after an ice storm, and “Water Tower” opens with the line “there’s a lot of love in this land locked town, some days I try and drink it down.” 

“Get Real” is an altogether beautiful song, and fantastic close to the album – a breathtaking reflection on life in New Orleans “after the storm” that slowly heats up until it boils over with emotion. By the time the song nears that emotional break, I can’t imagine hearing “when the mud starts rushing down and crushing through the town, I better find some loving hands and hold on for dear life” with dry eyes.

Heavy Makes You Happy tells stories of experiences we’ve shared collectively through the lens of the individual. I remember being without power for nine days following the ice storm of 2009, the yearly flooding of the Elkhorn Creek, and watching helplessly from Kentucky as Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans at full force. Warren has chronicled his own memories of these experiences, and many more, into songs that add up to an emotional album that feels relatable and bittersweet from start to finish. For someone who has lived in Lexington his whole life, this album makes me homesick, even though I still live here.

Tracks I Liked: Elkhorn Flood Blues!, Ice!!, New Best Friend!, Water Tower!!, Get Real!!!

Ben Southworth – August 28, 2016 – Kenwick Place

Small Batch – True Loves

a3651039114_10Acoustic Folk

Self-Released – December 4th, 2015

The first time I saw Small Batch perform, they were set up on the porch of Griffin’s Modern Motel as we celebrated the mounting of the Colonel Harland Sanders weathervane on the building’s top-most turret. But even though I’d never seen these five perform together before, I had heard many of them perform in other groups before –
in fact, these five have played in so many groups between them that I really can’t think of a good way to type it all out here. All this is to say – Small Batch is comprised of some very talented and experienced musicians, and True Loves is reflective of this.

True Loves is named for the album’s second track, an up-tempo coming-of-age song ruminating on the joy of youth and navigating family dynamics. The songs here come across as honest and personal reflections, and the album is made more interesting by the fact that no two songs in a row are sung by the same person. Though Small Batch ends up having three lead singers over the course of these songs – Reva Williams, Tree Jackson, and Warren Byrom – the consistently tight instrumentation and vocal harmonies keep True Loves sounding like one, cohesive work. What is gained from this is a feeling of well-roundedness – it’s nice to glean some philosophical and musical insight from each member of the band individually.12334034_875573949217235_2085846597_o

Standouts on the album for me are “Dark Days,” “Home,” and “Tickled Pink” – each for a different reason. “Dark Days” is a model for what a good lead-off track can sound like: it starts off simply, gradually adds texture and energy, and possesses a really gorgeous chorus that showcases Reva’s voice and the band’s knack for vocal harmonies. “Home” is a song of Warren’s (also recorded on his album, The Fabled Canelands) that shows off Small Batch’s ability to flesh out a member’s ideas for a song – adding what needs to be added, but with restraint. “Tickled Pink” is light, fun, quick-shuffling, and short – in much the same way that “Dark Days” was the perfect way to start the album, “Tickled Pink” is a great way of closing it.

It’s certainly worth mentioning that for all the great songwriting chops that the three singers bring to the band, they’re backed up by two very talented rhythm players. With Scott Wilmoth on bass and Robby Cosenza on drums, the group is held together sturdily, but in a way that both musicians are able to add their own sort of signature on the sound. Either’s presence on True Loves is felt as strongly as any other, and between all five members you’ve got a group of very talented, tasteful, and experienced musicians making some very good music. True Loves is honest, refreshing, insightful, and an album that I’m very hopeful people will decide to hear.

Tracks I Liked: Dark Days!!!, True Loves!, Jubilee!, Arizona!, Home!!, Tickled Pink!!

Join Small Batch and Bear Medicine this Friday (December 4) for a couple record release shows at the Green Lantern!

Ben Southworth – November 27th, 2015 – Mount Horeb