Tagged: garage

Satellite Twin – The Mechanical Hearts EP

a0597827793_10Post Punk Garage Rock

October 17th, 2015 – Gubbey Records

The Mechanical Hearts EP is the product of Louisville’s hard driving trio, Satellite Twin – the EP is a collection of five spacey, angular songs that tie together sounds from both prog, post, and punk rock. Most of the songs start with extended instrumental sections that shuffle back and forth between off-kilter phrases, and even when they get to the lyrics, they’re usually not around for too long. The instrumental ability of the band is the most important part of the album – two of the three musicians can be doing something fairly repetitive, keeping perfect time while the third goes off on some sort of totally outrageous pattern. Satellite Twin would play well in a live setting – I imagine that the show would only amplify the intensity and excitement that the band is able to capture on the tape. The final track of the album, “cracks and stains (on the marquee slogan)” is the obvious stand out here – you can feel the song getting more and more anxious as it heads towards the chorus, bursts forth into an incredibly catchy recitation of the song’s title, does a quick coordinated turnaround, and heads back into the song’s main groove. Other tracks are good too – the breakdown that happens towards three minute mark of “raise the sign” feels like it comes out of nowhere, and it’s an incredibly satisfying way to end the song. The Mechanical Hearts EP is has a way of being simultaneously atmospheric and hazy while feeling intense and relentless. Another strong release from an inventive Louisville band, this is worth checking out.

Tracks I Liked: raise the sign!!, mechanical hearts!, cracks and stains (on the marquee slogan)!!!

Ben Southworth – November 15th, 2015 – William T. Young Library

The Wrists – The Wrists

a3578620648_10Psychedelic Garage Rock

auralgamiSOUNDS – January 16th, 2015

The Wrists are a band from Louisville, Kentucky who excel at coming up with catchy, lo-fi tunes. It’s not quite like Pavement, not quite like Wax Fang, and not quite like Jovontaes – the band comes in somewhere between all three, adds its own touch, and they end up being really great to listen to.

They’re able to incorporate nice grooves into the first track, “Untitled,” which then flows straight into the second track. “Tombs” is a little less groove oriented, a little more somber, a few more parts mellow, and totally one of the stronger tracks on the album – the chord progressions and lead guitar playing add some nice emotion to the song. “Went West” has the pop sensibility of a Stephen Malkmus song plus a ton of fuzz, and “The Drip” is appropriately titled for a quick-driving, slimy track such as itself. “Meteor” is my favorite song here – it plays duets between the vocals and lead guitar while the rest of the texture is filled out with all sorts of noise, and remains an extremely catchy track. The album ends with a pair of tracks that fit together, “Into” and “The Cloud” – the former sets them up with harmonious arpeggiation and spacey moans on a reverby guitar before the latter comes in with sounds that approach post-rock grandiosity.

The album is one of my favorites that I’ve gotten to hear in a while. It walks the line between fuzzy garage rock and indie pop, and comes through as a really satisfying listen.

Tracks I Liked: Tombs, Went West, Meteor, The Cloud

Ben Southworth – March 31st, 2015 – Maxwell and Hagerman