Tagged: joan shelley

Daniel Martin Moore – Turned Over to Dreams

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Hushed Contemporary Lullabies

Sofaburn Records – July 7, 2017

Daniel Martin Moore has been making music in Kentucky for a number of years – as a solo musician, and in collaborations with such well-known Kentuckians as Ben Sollee, Joan Shelley, and Jim James. I first heard him on the 2010 album, Dear Companion with Ben Sollee, which remains one of my favorite albums. Turned Over to Dreams finds Daniel on his own, where he has crafted a beautiful, soothing album of lullabies.

The title track quietly twinkles into focus before Daniel’s gentle voice joins – the remainder of the song is boosted by warm, quiet strings. “Consider the Worlds” is more simply orchestrated, finding Daniel’s voice the focus of the song. A brief, three-song set of instrumental lullabies is next – set with organ, shimmery electric guitar, and piano, respectively. “You Are Home” stands out to me the as my favorite of the album – the very first lyrics, “you are so much more to me than just a bright light, you’re home’ are gently boosted a low, droning organ as Daniel wonders how to best find the way to say ‘I love you.’

Those who know Daniel’s music and voice should find this album familiar and comforting – new listeners may find it a good way to discover his remaining, earlier work. From song to song, and as complete work, Turned Over to Dreams is a richly colored, serene, intimate lullaby.

Tracks I Liked: Turned Over to Dreams!!, Consider the Worlds!, Amid the Stars!, You Are Home!!!, Stay Awake!

Ben Southworth – August 6, 2017 – Post Road

Joan Shelley – Joan Shelley

a2716870051_10Acoustic Americana

No Quarter – May 5, 2017

Louisville’s Joan Shelley is known for her quiet, soothing music and beautiful, clear voice – Joan Shelley is elegantly all of these things, and a quietening listening experience throughout. The album begins with the quiet track, “We’d Be Home,” featuring a pair of guitars churning softly beneath Joan’s voice as she repeats “if you were made for me, we’d be home.” On “Where I’ll Find You,” the space is filled with shuffling, brushed percussion and a light organ – the song’s highlight is Joan’s vocal duet in the chorus. My favorite of the album is “Even Though,” a brief, simply-orchestrated song of plodding, finger-picked guitar and voice that manages a beautiful, melancholic fullness in its sound. Piano is added to the texture on “Pull Me Up One More Time,” with electric guitars crying softly in the background – Joan addresses her sister, “have I lingered too long, sister?” before reaching out for a hand, “pull me up one more time, for I have fallen.” The album ends with a droning, dissonant acoustic guitar on “Isn’t that Enough,” where piano doubles Joan’s voice several octaves below during the verses; her final lyrics of the album ask, “isn’t that enough, that you were meant to be free?”

The talent of the album’s remarkable collaborating musicians James Elkington, Nathan Salsburg, and Jeff and Spencer Tweedy is in their subtlety and restraint, adding only what is essential to the texture of these songs. Joan Shelley is an utterly appropriate title for its namesake’s fourth LP – despite the album’s superstar collaborators, Joan’s signature voice and songwriting are the driving, dominant force behind this music. I’d recommend this album with headphones, so you can catch every beautiful, nuanced note beneath the surface.

Tracks I Liked: We’d Be Home!!, Where I’ll Find You!, Even Though!!!, Pull Me Up One More Time!!, Wild Indifference!, Isn’t That Enough!

Ben Southworth – May 1, 2017 – Kenwick Place